flummadiddle

flummadiddle

So many puppies. But none of them will be Word of the Year.

Clement, I wasn’t sure of its meaning, so I looked it up. That’s when I stumbled on this story on the Miriam Webster Dictionary site about popular word searches and the word of the year according to that site at least. 

Trending words this year included: Fascism. Misogyny. Acrimonious. Nasty. Bigot. Puppy?

However, the Miriam Webster website might have influenced the trending searches by asking its visitors to search for something other than the most searched for word: Fascism.

The site didn’t want Fascism to be its “Word of the year,” and it was looking like that was going to happen since the formula used to determine the Word of the year was simply the most searched for word.

After Miriam Webster asked its visitors to search for something else such as ‘Flumdiddle.’

I don’t know if I helped the cause at all, but I bit. I did not search for Fascism, but I did search for flummadiddle.

  1. something foolish or worthless:  nonsense, trash
  2. bauble, frill

 

Actually, there is a second, more important criteria that influenced Miriam Websters choice for their Word of the Year, and that is “words that show a greater year-over-year increase.” In other words, fascism won’t automatically be the choice for this year’s word. That means a word like ‘puppy, flummadiddle, sockdolager, or maybe even clement.

And by the way, I thought ‘clement’ meant easy or mild and I was right.

  1. inclined to be merciful: lenient <a clement judge>
  2. mild <clement weather for this time of year>

Source: In a Time of Uncertainty, a Divided Nation Searches for Puppies – Trending 12/2/2016 | Merriam-Webster

Quite a Sad Story: First, Because a Family Was Terrorized; Second, Because the Man Doing the Terrorizing Didn’t Even Know He Was Doing It!

Quite a Sad Story: First, Because a Family Was Terrorized; Second, Because the Man Doing the Terrorizing Didn’t Even Know He Was Doing It!

Oren Aharon Cohen told police he does not remember details of this incident because he was “black out drunk.”

The Washington Post reported this story about a family that woke up to find a stranger holding their two-year-old daughter. The man tossed the child on a sofa. He says he thought he was playing with a midget. He says he was so drunk he didn’t really know where he was or what he was actually doing.

Now, Cohen is in jail, charged with a number of crimes and wants to be deported. He feels he should be released because as far as he’s concerned all he did was go in the wrong door and play with a dwarf.

Whenever I read something like this I wonder, ‘Why do people do stupid stuff like this? ‘ Why would they want or allow themselves to get so drunk they don’t know what they’re doing. I have never understood why anyone would drink till they’ve lost control of themselves. I understand the idea of ‘getting buzzed.’ Sometimes it’s nice to feel lighter, to feel like we have fewer problems and worries, to feel a little better if only for a moment. But that often becomes the problem. The feeling is temporary. Then the feeling wears off, we get sober and we have to deal with the reason or reasons we wanted to get buzzed. Either that or we have to continue drinking (or do drugs) in order to continue dealing with our issues by not dealing with them.

No matter what a person’s reason for drinking till he or she loses control, the end result is almost always disappointing. Eventually, we have to face our problems or we continue not facing them until something much worse, often something terrible happens and we are forced to face our problems either in jail, in a hospital, or in a morgue.

I don’t know why Oren Aharon Cohen drank till he was ‘black out drunk,” but it resulted in a double tragedy. First, a family will likely be having nightmares or live in an amount of fear for awhile, maybe forever, and a man is in jail and probably going to be deported from a country he may not have been planning to leave. The saddest part about this is that Cohen doesn’t appear to realize he has a problem.

I worked with a Sport Reporter a number of years who was very good at his job, award worth;, but the rest of his life was a mess. As a result, he found any excuse to celebrate, which always meant drinking till he was ‘black out drunk.’ He often woke up in jail, having no idea how he got there. The worst though, was the night he pounded on the front door screaming for his wife to let him in. The problem was the house wasn’t his and he was 30 miles from home. He thought it was pretty funny. It took him awhile to face his problems, but it wasn’t until after he lost his wife and his job. A terrible tragedy because the first time I heard him I thought he would some day be working at a major market radio or TV station. Unfortunately, that wasn’t the path he chose and in the end, it’s all just a choice.

Source: A dad was awakened by his toddler’s crying. He found a stranger holding her in the living room. – The Washington Post

Future & Past

The stone raised over you by the future will become your past.” ~ Jane Yolen

In Texas, a religious liberty battle rages at one school over quote from ‘A Charlie Brown Christmas’

In Texas, a religious liberty battle rages at one school over quote from ‘A Charlie Brown Christmas’

State and local officials are interpreting Texas’s Merry Christmas Law differently.

A scene from “A Charlie Brown Christmas”

It will forever baffle me why people feel another person does not have the right to express a belief different from theirs in any public location. Simply by attempting to deny that person from expressing their belief is in itself an expression of belief.

Am I making sense here? Or am I far off base? The person who says you do not have the right to express your belief is saying, but I have the right to express my opposing belief.

The person who says you do not have the right to express your belief is also saying, but I have the right to express my opposing belief.

In this instance,  a school nurse expressed a religious belief – a religious meaning of Christmas – some parents apparently demanded that she take down a poster hanging on her office door and that she not be allowed to express her belief because the school was a public place and their children should not be exposed to such beliefs.

It baffles me why people are so afraid of an opposing belief. Simply by allowing someone to express that opposing belief does not mean you are accepting it or agreeing with it. Usually, you can take it or leave it. You can turn off the TV, change the channel, burn the paper, leave the room, or stop listening. Just because someone says or does something in your presence does not mean you are agreeing with what they are saying or doing. Even if they hold a gun to your head they cannot change what you truly believe.

Where children are concerned parents cannot watch over everything the child sees or does. They cannot micromanage the child. Good communication and time spent with the child will be much more effective than trying to control the child’s surroundings. Being open, honest, and understanding with the child will usually give the child the ability to decide for him or herself what is harmful and what is not, what should be believed and what should not.

I imagine most of the children in that school did not think one way or another about what the nurse had hanging on her door. They probably thought it was nice. They probably related to it because they had seen it on TV. They probably did not think there was anything right or wrong about it until some parents rather than have faith in their children’s ability to understand something for what it was, decided to take that ability away from their child.

The way I see it, those parents are poor parents. I doubt they communicate well with their child. I imagine they are authoritarian and afraid to let their children make their own choices. In other words, they want their children to be sheep, not shepherds.

Do you agree or disagree?

Source: In Texas, a religious liberty battle rages at one school over quote from ‘A Charlie Brown Christmas’ – The Washington Post

Arnold Lobel Quote

“I know I know how to draw pictures. With writing, I don’t really know what I’m doing. It’s very intuitive.” ~ Arnold Lobel